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Stolen Statues of Persepolis Discovered in Bushehr

 

 

Tuesday, 25 June2001

 


BUSHEHR -- Five statues stolen from the historical Persepolis site, capital of ancient Persia's Achaemenian dynasty in Fars Province, were discovered in the city of Dashtestan in this southern province during the past two days, it was announced here on Monday.

According to a report released by Bushehr police on Sunday, the city's police forces discovered five statues including two golden and three silver deer belonging to the Persepolis in the house of a resident of Dashtestan. The owner of the house was also arrested by the forces.

 

The thieves were also arrested by the police forces of Fars Province, the report said adding that they confessed that they sold the statues to a local resident of Bushehr Province, IRNA said.

 

The ruins of Persepolis lie about 640 kilometers (400 miles) south of the Iranian capital of Tehran.  Darius the Great is said to have started building the site between 518 and 516 BCE, but most of it perished in flames when Alexander II of Macedonia conquered and burnt it in 330 BCE.

 

 

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