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Meymand, One of the Most Ancient Villages in the World

 

 

29 November 2001


TEHRAN -- Undoubtedly, Meymand is one of the oldest continually inhabited places in Iran and the world. Researchers say that the village dates back to 4000-6000 B.C. Archaeologists have discovered 6000-year-old earthenware in the village. The ancient residents of the village buried their dead in circular buildings.

Meymand is located in northwestern Kerman Province, 35 kilometers from the town of Babak on the Tehran-Bandar Abbas Road. Unlike other ancient villages, Meymand has retained its culture.

Meymand is an interesting place for tourists and researchers. It is the best place to study the ancient culture of Iran. There is a Zoroastrian temple in the village. The rocky architecture of Meymand is unique in the world. The residents of the village still live in the same type of circular buildings which were used as tombs.

All the public buildings, like the mosque, school, bathhouse, and houses, have been dug out of the mountains. The buildings have two to five stories. The rooms are cut out of mountain and stone. The village is like an oblique skyscraper which was designed thousands of years ago.

 

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