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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Archaeologists Fond Ancient Temple in Margiana

 

News Category:

Prehistory

 26 April 2004

 

 

Archaeologists have made a sensational discovery in former Iranian province of Margiana (what is today Turkmenistan) -- a temple of water dating back to the third millennium B.C.

The Margian-skaya expedition has been digging on the site of an ancient settlement called Gonur in the delta of the Murgab River in the eastern Mary region, some 200 miles east of Ashgabad.

Victor Sarianidi, a prominent Russian archaeologist, leads the expedition, which discovered a rounded hollow about 55 yards in diameter and between eight and nine feet deep. The hollow is a short distance away from the royal palace dug out earlier.

The scientists suspect the hollow was a man-made pool used for religious ceremonies. A system of gutters carried rainwater to it and there is evidence water also could flow into the pool from the Murgab.

It once was thought that tribes living there had been fire-worshippers, but the scientists said it is more likely they were water-worshippers -- or perhaps worshipped both.

 

 

 

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