cais1.gif (153930 bytes)

CAIS Persian Text.gif (34162 bytes)

CAIS

The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies


 Persian Section.PNG (9914 bytes)


Home


About CAIS


Articles


Daily News


News Archive


Announcements


CAIS Seminars


Image Library


Copyright


Disclaimer


Submission


Search


Contact Us


Links


Facebook-Button.jpg (107165 bytes)



.

CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

6,000-Year-Old Archaeological Site Discovered in Sarvestan

 

13 August 2004

 

 

While excavating Sarvestan Palace, one of the most magnificent monuments of the Sasanid era (226-651), Iranian archaeologists have unearthed a vast archaeological site south of Iran.


Housing Iran’s oldest brick cupola, the palace was built during the reign of Bahram "Gur" (The Zebra-Hunter, 420-438 A.D.) as a leisure mansion. Mehr-Nersi, his well-known minister ordered the construction of this palace. It has one entrance corridor (ivan) and the dome is located in the center of the building.


The new discovery has revealed that the area was inhabited since 6,000 years ago, 4,500 years older than previous estimates, said Amir Pirooz Daghooghi, project manager. “We have unearthed earthenware vessels in the site, clearly indicating the area was inhabitable since the 4th millennium BC,” he added.


Located in Fars Province, it is made of brick, stone and plaster. Since 1956, major renovations took place. This monument has been registered on the list of National Monuments of Iran. The site was just explored prior to the 1979, after which the work stopped.


 

my_Iran.jpg (13682 bytes)

"History is the Light on the Path to Future"

 

Persian_NOT_Farsi_by_Shapour_Suren-Pahlav_3D2.gif (177309 bytes)


 

Encyclopaedia Iranica


BIPS.jpg (15695 bytes)

The British Institute of Persian Studies


"Persepolis Reconstructed"

Persepolis_reconstructed2.jpg (36944 bytes)

Persepolis3D


The British Museum


The Royal

Asiatic Society


Persian_Gulf_Facebook.jpg (1935028 bytes)

The Persian Gulf

Facebook Page




Please use your "Back" button (top left) to return to the previous page

Copyright © 1998-2015 The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies (CAIS)