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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Iranian Artists Decorated Umayyad Palaces

 

09 June 2004

 

 

One of the murals from Qusay 'Amra in Sasanian Style

 

 

Experts on Islamic arts believe Iranian artists and craftsmen have built most palaces and mansions of Umayyad era in Syria and Jordan with Iranian styles of architecture.

 

 “Following some studies on relics of these palaces in modern Syria, such great researchers as Bazil Gray have concluded the buildings date back to Sasanid era. No matter whether these palaces were constructed in Sasanid or Umayyad times, all arts scholars agree most of these edifices were erected with the assistance of Iranian artists and craftsmen and according to Persian styles of architecture,” said Ataollah Afrooz , an Islamic arts specialist.

 

Commenting on the style of decorating the palaces, he added, “Caliphs started embellishing their mansions and even bathrooms with paintings since the 800’s.

 

Few remaining painting works dating back to the first era of Islamic reign in Persia, Syria and Iraq clearly show that frescos and murals were thriving under the rule of Caliphs in Umayyad and early Abbasid periods.”

 

 

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