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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Cobblestones of Historical Chahar-Bagh St to be Unearthed

 

13 June 2004

 

 

Cultural experts and archaeologists plan to dig out the relics of the cobblestones on the historical street of Chahar-Bagh Abbasi in Isfahan.


Chahar-Bagh (Four Gardens) is one of the oldest and finest streets in Iran, built during the Safavid dynasty and decked out with fountains, trees, mansions and unique cobblestones.

 

“Given the historical importance of the avenue in particular and the city of Isfahan in general, we have a major plan to excavate Chahar-Bagh Abbasi Street and dig out the relics left over from the Safavid era (1501-1722),” said Mr. Khavari, cultural heritage expert in Isfahan, about 400 km (250 m) south of Tehran.


The subway officials in the city intend to have the route pass under the street, but they are faced with a public outcry. Chahar-Bagh Abbasi Street was built under the reign of Shah Abbas the Graet (1587 - 1629).

 

The Safavids, who came to power in 1501, were leaders of a militant Sufi order. They traced their ancestry to Shaykh Safi ad Din (died circa 1334), the founder of their order, who claimed descent from Shiite Islam's Seventh Imam, Musa al Kazim. In 1501, under their leader Shah Ismail, the Safavids seized power in Tabriz, which became their capital and later Qazvin and Isfahan.


The Safavid state reached its apogee during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great. The shah gained breathing space to confront and defeat the Uzbeks by signing a largely disadvantageous treaty with the Ottomans. He then fought successful campaigns against the Protégées and Ottomans, reestablishing Iranian control over Khvarvaran (modern Iraq), Georgia, and Caucasus.


 

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