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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Prophet Zoroaster Established Ancient Calendar Aged 43

 

News Category:  Prehistory - Religion

 19 June 2004

 

 

An Iranian researcher believes Prophet Zoroaster, had devised a special way to keep the records of time and even established an ingenious calendar.


Although modern studies on national, ethnic and ancient calendars began 150 years ago in Iran, only few researchers have been truly keen on the subject and have managed to decipher archaic ways of keeping time. Hassan Pakzadian is one of them. He has endeavored to reveal some secrets of the calendar concocted by Prophet Zoroaster.


Zoroaster wrote down his beliefs in a sacred book known as the “Avesta”. The central theme of the religion he promoted is a deep belief in the struggle between the good and the evil. At that time, Persians had a dual system with “Ahura Mazda” (light) representing goodness and “Ahriman” (darkness), a symbol of the evil.


Pakzadian said Prophet Zoroaster, while praying to God for 10 years in a cave, devised a special calendar aged 43 and organized it till his birth year in 3358 B.C.

 

 

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