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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Sasanid Bust Discovered in Bishapour

 

15 November 2004

 

 

A Sasanid bust weighing 10 kilograms and dating back to 1,700 years ago is unearthed in the ancient city of Bishapour, Fars province.


While restoring the forts of Bishapour, the bride of Sasanid cities, archeologists came across the bust along the Qanemieh-Kazeroon road, parting the city into two sections, experts told Iran’s Cultural Heritage News Agency (CHN).


The unique sculpture depicts a human head, whose beard resembles that of Sasanid style, said project manager Mosayeb Amiri.


"The nose, eyes and forehead of the bust resemble those of people living in the Sasanid period," he noted. Surveys revealed the sculpture was unlikely to portray any king or commanders of the empire, he noted.


The white-colored bust, made of plaster and broken up into two from across its nose, is currently maintained in Bishapour's treasury and experts plan to study it in the coming weeks.


According to Amiri, the bust is not part of a full statue and was used as a decorative object.


 

 

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