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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Theory of Ili-pi Kings Ruling over Lorestan Consolidated

 

20 May 2005

 

 

This sixth season of excavations in the “Sorkh Dom Laki” district of Lorestan Province has helped archeologists to consolidate their theory that suggests once the less illustrious kings of the Ili-pi dynasty used to reign there.


The inadvertent discovery of a rock decorated with reliefs, unearthed by smugglers, led archeologists to find the area. The excavations started in 1998 and since last fall its 6th season has begun.


“Sorkh Dom Laki is one of the districts in a massive site that we have so far discovered in the province. During our excavations, we have managed to unearth archeological sites, artifacts, pottery dating back to the Iron Age. We have also discovered some potteries going back to the mid-Iron Age, indicating the area could be much older,” said Arman Shishegaran, reach director of the project.


He added the experts started their task with a later-confirmed hypothesis that Ili-pi kings lived and reigned here. “Local people had succeeded in establishing a humble and independent kingdom in the area as early as the first half of the first millennium BC, lasting till the Sassanid dynasty."
             

 

 

 

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