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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Remains of Wine Production Found in Bolaghi Valley

 

25 May 2005

 

 

A sloped pool leading to a canal at one side with remains of potsherds at the end of the canal were discovered, proving that the ancient residents of Bolaghi Valley produced wine at the site. 

 

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  Discovered Sasanian Wine production in Bolaghi Valley (Click to enlarge)

 

Iranian and Polish archaeologists working in Bolaghi Valley behind the newly constructed Dam of Sivand have discovered structures used for wine production.

Bolaghi Valley located 4 kilometers from the World Heritage Site of Pasargadae of Fars province is thought to be the location of the most ancient road of Persia, the King Road.

According to the Iranian head of the joint team of Iranian and Polish experts, Ali Asadi, a sloped pool leading to a canal at one side with remains of potsherds at the end of the canal were discovered, proving that the ancient residents of Bolaghi Valley produced wine at the site.

Similar structures had previously found in other sites including Mamourin Tepe. As Asadi explained, “Residents of the area at the Sasanid era dumped the grapes in the pool, squashed them and collected the juice in wine jars put at the end of the canals.”

The pool measures 50x20 centimeters and is made out of cobblestones with a mortar cover which was apparently restored at the time of its use.

The discovery can be of great help in understanding the agricultural and horticultural methods of the time and how people earned their living, explained Barbara Kaim, the Polish head of the joint team of archaeologists, adding that despite the fact that no grapevines today exist in the area, the architectural discovery is proof of the existence of trees and wine production at the ancient times.

Previously the archaeologists working in the area had discovered large clay pots which they had assumed to be most probably used for keeping the drinks. Experts are planning to carry out further studies to find remains of grape in the soil of the site.

The most ancient wine of the world seems to have been found in a 5000-5500 BC vase in Ajjii Tepe in Iran.

 

 

 

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