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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Iranians Pioneers of Windmills

 

14 October 2005

 

(Iran Daily) - Iran will be registered on United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO) heritage list as the forerunner in developing the windmill industry in the world, CHN reported.


The country boasts of the highest number of these traditional structures with a total of 2,000 windmills.


Hamid Shahinpour, a researcher and instructor at Sharif University of Technology in an article on Iranian windmills called on officials to pave the way for the registration of this technology on UNESCO list.


“Some time ago, I wrote an article titled ’Using Renewable Energies in Eastern Iran’ that deeply interested Mohammad Beheshti, head of Iran’s Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization’s Research Center,“ he noted, adding that Beheshti, who was aware of the significance of registering windmills, decided to pursue its registration on the UN body’s natural heritage list.


However, acting head of the organization, Mohit Tabatabaei believed that windmills should be registered on UNESCO’s spiritual heritage list since they fall in the category of traditional technology.


Some UNESCO experts maintain that they should be registered on the natural heritage list.


However, professor Shariar Adl, an expert on Iranian heritage at UNESCO said that registration of Iranian windmills on UNESCO heritage list is impossible.
Shahinpour believed that even Holland, which is called ’A Land of Windmills’, has taken this traditional technology from the Iran’s Sistan province during the Crusades.


Iranian windmills date back to 2,800 years ago, while the industry in Holland has a history of 350 years.