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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

 

Soapstone and Cultural Relations between Qom and Jiroft

 

28 January 2006

 

 

LONDON, (CAIS) -- Discovery of three ornamental soapstone beads, used in Jiroft during ancient times, in Qoli Darvish historical site in Qom, strengthened the possibility of the existence of cultural relations between the Central and Eastern Plateau of Iran during the third millennium BC, English Service of CHN reported today, Saturday  January 28th.

“We discovered three ornamental soapstone beads in Qoli Darvish Tepe. The samples of this kind of stone can only be seen in Kerman province especially near Jiroft. They are very similar to those of Eastern Plateau of Iran,” said Siamak Sarlak, head of excavation team at Qoli Darvish historical site about archeological excavations in the third layers of this site belonging the third millennium BC.

According to Sarlak, since soapstone did not exist in the Central Plateau, these beads must have been brought to this region from the Eastern Plateau where they were largely in use, which indicates the existence of cultural relations between these two historical regions during the ancient times.

Prior to this, discovery of some kinds of special bowls in Qoli Darvish Tepe revealed a possible relationship between Qoli Darvish historical site in the Central Plateau and the Eastern Plateau of Iran.

“For sure Qoli Darvish Tepe was a prominent region during the third millennium BC. It was later transformed into a big city during the first millennium BC. Although we can not claim that this historical site was directly in relation with the Eastern Plateau of Iran and Jiroft, considering the evidence remained there, it can be concluded that there was somehow a cultural relation between the Central and Eastern Plateau of Iran despite the long distance that separates them,” explained Sarlak.

 

  

 

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