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CAIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS©

ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS OF THE IRANIAN WORLD

 

Destruction of Sasanian Da va Dokhtar Fortress is being Resumed

 

10 October 2006

 

 

 

LONDON, (CAIS) -- A plaster company recently resumed blasting operations near the Sasanian Da va Dokhtar Fortress in Ramhormoz, Khuzestan Province according to a report by Mehr News on Tuesday.

 

The process allegedly had been halted by the Ramhormoz Judiciary Department last May due to a complaint by the Ramhormoz Cultural Heritage and Tourism Office (RCHTO). The company had been conducting such operations at the site for 30 years.

 

RCHTO experts believe that the frequent blasts are the main reason for the damage to the Da va Dokhtar Fortress.

 

“We had previously reached an agreement with the managers of the plaster company to settle the problem out of court. They also agreed to stop blasting operations and compensate the RCHTO for the damage to the Fortress, but we have recently been informed that the company has resumed the process,” RCHTO director Fereidun Bigdeli told the Persian service of CHN on Tuesday.

 

“The officials of the company believe that the blasting operations have no negative effect on the Fortress, although the sound of the blasts is heard for 15 kilometers and the Fortress is located only a few hundred meters away from the location of the blasts,” he added.

 

“The Ramhormoz public prosecutor had previously visited the site and asked the company’s officials to halt the operations until the court announces its decision. But the appeal was verbal, so they didn’t take it seriously,” Bigdeli explained.

 

The Fortress consisted of two parts, one of which is totally destroyed. A wall four meters in height connected the two sections together. Thirty watchtowers mounted the wall, but only a few remain.  

 

 

Extracted From/Source: Mehr News

Please note the above-news is NOT a "copy & paste" version from the mentioned-source. The news/article above has been modified with the following interventions by CAIS: Spelling corrections; -Rectification and correction of the historical facts and data; - Providing additional historical information within the text; -Removing any unnecessary, irrelevant & repetitive information.

     All these measures have been taken in order to ensure that the published news provided by CAIS is coherent, accurate and suitable for academics and cultural enthusiasts who visit the CAIS website.

 

 

 

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