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.CAIS NEWS©

ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS OF THE IRANIAN WORLD

 

Salman-e Farsi Dam Devouring Sasanian City in Southern Iran

 

04 April 2007

 

 

 

LONDON, (CAIS) -- Archaeological studies show that a Sasanian city is being submerged in the reservoir of the Salman-e Farsi Dam, which is currently being filled in Fars Province, southern Iran.

 

“There were plans to excavate a number of Sasanian tappehs and other ancient sites in this area, but Islamic Republic's officials have begun filling the dam without informing the Cultural Heritage, Tourism, and Handicrafts Organization (CHTHO),” the director of the Archaeological Research Centre of Iran (ARCI) told the Persian service of CHN on Wednesday.

 

“Talks about the excavations were held in summer 2006, and it was decided that the Fars Regional Water Company would finance the excavations and the studies on the reservoir,” Mohammad-Hassan Fazeli Nashli added.

 

An ARCI archaeological team is currently surveying ancient sites in the region and the studies show that a Sasanian city is being submerged by the reservoir, he explained.

 

“The dam is being filled without the CHTHO’s permission, and the process should be stopped as soon as possible,” Fazeli Nashli noted.

 

Construction of the dam was started over a decade ago, but the CHTHO officials of the time did not object to the project.

 

“If the former officials did not do their jobs correctly, it is not related to today’s responsibilities. It is our duty to protect cultural heritage, and Energy Ministry officials should also have such an attitude,” Fazeli Nashli said.

 

Fars Province is home to many significant sites of the Sasanian Empire and this city, which consists of 21 sites, is very important for archaeological studies.

 

In addition, 42 sites from the Elamite, Achaemenid, Parthian, Sasanian, and post-Sasanian eras will be flooded by the Mullah Sadra Dam’s reservoir, which engineers have been filling since May. The Marvast Dam is also under construction in the region.

 

The Sivand Dam, which will flood a large section of the Bolaghi Valley in Fars Province, is the most controversial case. The region has over 130 archaeological sites dating from prehistoric periods to the early post-Sasanian era.

 

The Sivand Dam’s reservoir was scheduled to be filled in early December, but the Bolaghi Valley has been given a reprieve to give experts more time to conduct archaeological excavations and research, and the filling of the dam has been postponed until September.  

 

 

 

Extracted From/Source: Mehr News

Please note the above-news is NOT a "copy & paste" version from the mentioned-source. The news/article above has been modified with the following interventions by CAIS: Spelling corrections; -Rectification and correction of the historical facts and data; - Providing additional historical information within the text; -Removing any unnecessary, irrelevant & repetitive information.

 

All these measures have been taken in order to ensure that the published news provided by CAIS is coherent, transparent, accurate and suitable for academics and cultural enthusiasts who visit the CAIS website.

 

 

 

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