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CAIS NEWS ©

LATEST ARCHAEOLOGICAL & CULTURAL NEWS OF IRAN & THE IRANIAN WORLD

 

Possible Discovery of Inshushinak Temple in Tal-e Sepid

 

11 March 2008

 

 

LONDON, (CAIS) -- The Iranian and Australian archaeology team excavating near the Tal-e Sepid village in Fars Province, believe they have discovered ruins of an Elamite temple dedicated to Inshushinak the 'God of after life', reported Persian service of CHN on Monday.


Alireza Asgari, director of  the Iranian team told the Persian service of CHN that “the site located in Fahliyan (ancient Pahliyan) plain was identified four years ago in which the research has shown that the site was in continuous occupation, from Elamite to post-Achaemenid eras. However, one of the most significant discoveries is unearthing a terrace belonging to the Elamite period, which possibly was a temple.”

 

In 1929 while Ernst Herzfeld was excavating in the area, the local chieftain presented him with an Elamite tablet. Herzfeld after studying the inscription concluded that the Inshushinak temple lies under the Tal-e Sepid.

 

Tal-e Sepid (white mound) is located within a village under the same name, In 1929 Ernst Herzfeld discovered remains of an Elamite wall, which he dated to 1500 BCE. Three kilometres east of Tal-e Sepid, there is a well-known Elamite rock relief known as Gūr-negūn.

 

 

 

Original News bulletin published in Persian by CHN , and translated and modified by CAIS [*]

 

 

 

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