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CAIS NEWS ©

Latest Archaeological and Cultural News of Iran and the Iranian World

 

Elamite Jar Burial Transferred to Haft-Tappeh Museum

 

01 July 2009

 

 

LONDON, (CAIS) -- Iran’s most intact jar burial, which dates back to the Elamite era, was transferred to the Haft-Tappeh Museum last week.

 

Containing a skeleton in fetal position, the jar was discovered during the latest excavation carried out several months ago at Haft-Tappeh, a major Elamite site near Susa in Khuzestan Province, the Persian service of CHN reported on Tuesday.

 

“This is the first time such an intact jar burial has been unearthed,” director of the Restoration Department of the Haft-Tappeh and Chogha Zanbil Center Kazem Borhani said.

 

“Urgent actions were taken to preserve the artefact in situ in order to safely transfer it to the centre for restoration,” he stated.

 

A piece of the jar has been removed to enable visitors to see the skeleton inside it, Borhani explained.

An anthropologist has begun a series of studies to determine the gender of the skeleton, which is believed to date back to the Middle Elamite period (c. 1500-1100 BCE). 

 

Iran’s most intact jar burial, which dates back to the Elamite era, was transferred to the Haft-Tappeh Museum last week.

 

Containing a skeleton in fetal position, the jar was discovered during the latest excavation carried out several months ago at Haft-Tappeh, a major Elamite site near Susa in Khuzestan Province, the Persian service of CHN reported on Tuesday.

 

“This is the first time such an intact jar burial has been unearthed,” director of the Restoration Department of the Haft-Tappeh and Chogha Zanbil Center Kazem Borhani said.

 

“Urgent actions were taken to preserve the artefact in situ in order to safely transfer it to the centre for restoration,” he stated.

 

A piece of the jar has been removed to enable visitors to see the skeleton inside it, Borhani explained.  

An anthropologist has begun a series of studies to determine the gender of the skeleton, which is believed to date back to the Middle Elamite period (c. 1500-1100 BCE).

 

 

 

 

Extracted From/Source: Mehr News [*]

  

 

 

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